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Page ATypI Antwerp Team
by Pedro Amado published Mar 15, 2017 last modified Jun 29, 2018 09:21 PM — filed under: , , , , , , , , ,
Starting in 1957, every year ATypI has hosted the most important and only truly global event on type and typography. This, of course, requires a significant amount of experience and manpower. We are happy to present the team behind our 2018 conference.
Located in Conferences / Antwerp 2018
Media Athena Ruby
by John Hudson published Dec 20, 2010 last modified Aug 26, 2015 11:39 PM — filed under: , ,
Athena Ruby: when shape has meaning. Presentation by John Hudson to ATypI Letter.2 in Buenos Aires on 4 October 2011
Located in Type & typography
Media Speed punk
by Yanone published Dec 20, 2010 last modified Aug 26, 2015 11:39 PM — filed under: , ,
Yanone introduces his software ‘Speed Punk’, a learning tool made to better understand the nature of Bézier curves. From the 2013 ATypI conference in Amsterdam.
Located in Type & typography
Media Yearning for kerning
by Frank Grießhammer published Dec 20, 2010 last modified Aug 26, 2015 11:39 PM — filed under: ,
Frank Grießhammer explain what creates an overflow in a kern table and what we can do about it. From the 2013 ATypI conference in Amsterdam.
Located in Type & typography
File Solving the challenges of Asian Web fonts
by Bill Davis published Dec 20, 2010 last modified Aug 26, 2015 11:39 PM — filed under: , ,
By Bill Davis. How are web developers in China, Korea and Japan coping with the large file sizes of Asian Web fonts? This presentation provides an overview of the challenges facing web developers, and a review of various Web font services emerging throughout Asia. Presented by Bill Davis, Monotype Imaging. Thursday, 11 October 2012, ATypI Hong Kong
Located in Type & typography
File text/texmacs Development of pan-CJK fonts
by Jürgen Willrodt published Dec 20, 2010 last modified Aug 26, 2015 11:39 PM — filed under: , ,
By Jürgen Willrodt. The development of fonts which are usable and acceptable in different countries using CJK ideograms in Asia requires the usage of multiple locale glyph variants for different countries. We discuss the technical requirements for such a font, the different options for implementation and the production process using the Ikarus font production system. We show as an example the integration of different CJK locales into our Nimbus Global font family. From the 2012 ATypI conference in Hong Kong.
Located in Type & typography
File Manipulating CID-keyed fonts using AFDKO tools
by Ken Lunde published Dec 20, 2010 last modified Aug 26, 2015 11:39 PM — filed under: ,
By Ken Lunde, Masataka Hattori. One of the seemingly least-understood features of many AFDKO (Adobe Font Development Kit for OpenType) tools is their ability to directly manipulate CID-keyed fonts, which are manifested as a CIDFont resource or CFF, or as the 'CFF' table of an OpenType/CFF font. CID-keyed fonts have several benefits, one of which is their ability to include multiple hint dictionaries, which are implemented as FDArray elements. This allows different hinting parameters to be applied to different glyphs, which is usually specified on a per-script basis. Another benefit is that CID-keyed fonts gracefully support thousands or even tens of thousands of glyphs, which is precisely why they are most commonly used for developing CJK fonts. CID-keyed fonts are almost always built by compiling, or 'rolling up', a large number of individual name-keyed fonts. When particular glyphs need to modified, removed, or added, most developers simply make the changes to the appropriate source name-keyed fonts, but this means that the CID-keyed font needs to be rebuilt from the ground up. However, it is possible, and quite easy, to make such changes directly to the CID-keyed font itself. This workshop will demonstrate how careful use and scripting of particular AFDKO tools, such as tx, mergeFonts, and rotateFont, can make working with larger CID-keyed fonts more of a joy than a pain. CID-keyed fonts serve as one of the source files when developing OpenType/CFF CJK fonts, so learning how to more easily manipulate such fonts can result in a much faster, more efficient, and less error-prone font development workflow. Other topics to be covered in this workshop will include techniques for establishing and applying hinting parameters for CID-keyed fonts through the use of AFDKO's stemHist and autohint tools, along with various ways to inspect the properties of a CID-keyed font. From the 2012 ATypI conference in Hong Kong
Located in Type & typography
File Kazuraki: under the hood
by Ken Lunde published Dec 20, 2010 last modified Aug 26, 2015 11:39 PM — filed under: ,
By Ken Lunde. Conventional CJK fonts are designed on the principle that each of their thousands (or tens of thousands) of glyphs occupies a fixed design space, typically a square, but sometimes a rectangle. Kazuraki, which was inspired by the handwriting of the famous 12th century Japanese artist, writer, and poet, Fujiwara no Teika, and designed by Adobe's Senior Type Designer, Ryoko Nishizuka, breaks this assumption. Designing the glyphs for fully-proportional CJK fonts, along with determining their horizontal and vertical metrics, presents several challenges. Turning this raw data into a fully-functional OpenType/CFF font requires special techniques to ensure that it behaves as expected in modern applications. This effort includes techniques for making the proportional metrics the default for both writing directions, horizontal and vertical, along with the proper handling of special glyphs, such as the hiragana ligatures that are intended to be used only for vertical writing. This presentation focuses on the technical hurdles that were overcome so that Kazuraki, with its unique typeface-design characteristics, could be implemented as a fully-functional OpenType/CFF font. Also covered is the broad extent to which the techniques used to design and implement Kazuraki are fully applicable to other CJK fonts besides Japanese. This presentation is intended to serve as a continuation of the "Kazuraki: Its Art & Design" presentation. From the 2012 ATypI conference in Hong Kong
Located in Type & typography
File GlyphWiki - a Wiki-based glyph design and font production system
by Taichi Kawabata published Dec 20, 2010 last modified Aug 26, 2015 11:39 PM — filed under: , ,
By Taichi Kawabata and Kamichi Koichi. Today, more than 75,000 CJK Unified/Compatibility Ideographs have been encoded in Unicode. However, there are many more such characters that have yet to be unencoded, either because they have simply not been standardized (or submitted for standardization), or because they exhibit sometimes subtle or minor glyph-design differences and are thus unified with an existing character. There is a strong demand to be able to distinguish these subtle or minor design differences. GlyphWiki, a Wiki-based collaborative glyph design system, is specifically architected to satisfy such needs. GlyphWiki enables anyone to design his/her own glyph, name it, and publish it as a TrueType font or SVG file. GlyphWiki has been used to develop the world's first font that includes glyphs for all CJK Unified/Compatibility Ideographs. This presentation will demonstrate the benefits of GlyphWiki, how it can be used to manage a large number of glyphs, and how to turn them into a fully-functional OpenType font. The accompanying paper describes GlyphWiki's architecture in detail, to include its glyph naming system, and how the features in the resulting OpenType font correspond to the Wiki-based naming schemes. From the 2012 ATypI conference in Hong Kong.
Located in Type & typography
File Designing CJK typeface under an unified concept
by Shinya Yagami published Dec 20, 2010 last modified Aug 26, 2015 11:39 PM — filed under: ,
Shinya Yagami. The Japanese writing system is formed by different characters such as Kanji, Kana, Alphabet, Numbers, Symbols including Emojis, etc. Japanese typeface that consists of more than 23,000 characters is sophisticatedly designed and formed through a long history of time. From the 2012 ATypI conference in Hong Kong. We have designed an expanded font family which has added horizontal and vertical adjustments of boldness of its character, that is called “A Gradation Family”. Furthermore, the formation of a multilingual font designed under the same logic, combining Chinese, Korean and Japanese, is going to be released soon. Morisawa Inc., a company having contributed to Japanese culture and typeface for more than 80 years, introduces the new chapter of the typeface.
Located in Type & typography