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Page 365typo and ATypI
by José Scaglione published Jun 02, 2016 last modified Jun 02, 2016 01:23 PM — filed under: ,
The 365typo yearbook represents a new level of self-awareness in the typographic community.
Located in About us
Media Expanding possibilities of typography
by Peter Bilak published Dec 20, 2010 last modified Aug 26, 2015 11:39 PM — filed under: ,
Expanding possibilities of typography. Presented by Peter Bilak to the ATypI Letter.2 conference in Buenos Aires on 4 October 2011
Located in Type & typography
Media Post-paper
by Claus Eggers Sørensen published Dec 20, 2010 last modified Aug 26, 2015 11:39 PM — filed under: , ,
Claus Eggers Sørensen delineates the emerging tropes of screen-based design, and how they differ from print design.
Located in Type & typography
Media Glossy design then and now
by Mark Barratt published Dec 20, 2010 last modified Aug 26, 2015 11:39 PM — filed under: , , ,
Mark Barratt talks about how the typography of marginalia - footnotes, glosses and asides - evolved. From the 2013 ATypI conference in Amsterdam.
Located in Type & typography
Media Designing with science
by Matthew Carter published Dec 20, 2010 last modified Aug 26, 2015 11:39 PM — filed under: , , ,
In this presentation, Matthew Carter and Kevin Larson discuss what letter recognition tests might uncover and how those results could be used in practice. From the ATypI 2013 conference in Amsterdam.
Located in Type & typography
Media The (potential) future of responsive typography
by Nick M Sherman published Dec 20, 2010 last modified Aug 26, 2015 11:39 PM — filed under: , ,
In this presentation Nick Sherman shares his views about the limitations of web typography. From the 2013 ATypI conference in Amsterdam.
Located in Type & typography
Media Inline vs outline
by Jo de Baerdemaeker published Dec 20, 2010 last modified Aug 26, 2015 11:39 PM — filed under: , ,
Jo de Baerdemaeker investigates the roots of manufacturing inline typefaces and illustrates the reasoning of their development through the typographic analysis of ornamented types. From the 2013 ATypI conference in Amsterdam.
Located in Type & typography
File Solving the challenges of Asian Web fonts
by Bill Davis published Dec 20, 2010 last modified Aug 26, 2015 11:39 PM — filed under: , ,
By Bill Davis. How are web developers in China, Korea and Japan coping with the large file sizes of Asian Web fonts? This presentation provides an overview of the challenges facing web developers, and a review of various Web font services emerging throughout Asia. Presented by Bill Davis, Monotype Imaging. Thursday, 11 October 2012, ATypI Hong Kong
Located in Type & typography
File object code And we forgot about the time: Flow, type and graphic design
by Chris Ro published Dec 20, 2010 last modified Aug 26, 2015 11:39 PM — filed under: , , ,
The presentation will discuss the phenomenon of ‘flow’ originally conceived and coined by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and its relationship to graphic design and typography. ‘Flow’ is a phenomenon often experienced in great quantity by musicians, artists and athletes. It is a moment of absolute concentration where the world, distractions and time all disappear in an unfiltered moment of focused activity. Some call it entering the zone or getting lost in the moment. The Korean word for this is ‘mohrib’ or ‘samae’. The Hindu word for this is ‘Samadhi’. It is a multi-cultural phenomenon and one that Csizkentmihalyi has found to lead to greater amounts of happiness and satisfaction. In generations past, ‘flow’ could similarly be heavily linked to the practice of design. Design was an all engrossing moment of ‘flow’ and it was often because of this state that some designers chose to be designers in the first place. But in recent years, the experience of ‘flow’ in the design process has decreased significantly. There are many factors that have contributed to this. The heavier use of computers and technology are a large part of this. The current design industry system and model are a part of this as well. This project examines this relationship between design and ‘flow’ and has done so with experiments both in form and typography, surveys and coursework within an academic setting. This presentation will tell the story of some of these investigations and take a closer look at this once strong but now diminishing relationship.
Located in Type & typography
File Black and white in Indian typography
by D. Udaya Kumar published Dec 20, 2010 last modified Aug 26, 2015 11:39 PM — filed under: , , ,
By D. Udaya Kumar. India is a diverse country with multiple scripts, Tamil and Sanskrit being the earliest among them. The ancient script, Brāhmī is the root of all Indian scripts. The script is also the parent to several other major script families of Central and Southeast Asia. Each of these Indian scripts evolved on its own course over centuries. The medium and tools used for writing played an important role in the evolution process. The palm leaf manuscripts were one of the major mediums used for written communication during the early periods. Their writing system and calligraphy were unlike the Far Eastern and Western calligraphic cultures. The concept of black and white was no concern for the calligrapher. In the majority of manuscripts the content was more important than the aesthetics of lettering or composition. On the other hand the present scripts have its roots from the unique writing system and medium. The scripts that has evolved with such culture and written practices reflected the same in the contemporary typography. Similar to the manuscript calligraphy the present typography that is seen all around has no concerns for the black and white. This raises the several important questions such as, is it important to balance the black and white in typography? Does the concept of black and white really matters in typography of Indian scripts? This paper primarily aims at understanding the concept of black and white in Indian typography especially in Tamil script. It discusses the calligraphy on palm leaf manuscript, influence of the medium and its writing system on letterforms. It also explores the issues related to aesthetics in Indian language typography in comparison to Western typography. From the ATypI 2012 conference in Hong Kong.
Located in Type & typography