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Event C source code 7th ICTVC 2019 | Challenging design paths
7th International Conference on Typography & Visual Communication (ICTVC), Main Conference 19–21 June | Workshops 17–18 June 2019, Patras, Greece
Located in Events
Media Ala has a pen
Verena Gerlach outlines the results of the type design workshop »Ala has a pen / Ala ma pióro«, which took place at the Academy of Fine Arts in Kotowice, Poland. From the 2013 ATypI conference in Amsterdam.
Located in Type & typography
News Item D source code ATypI 2019 Tokyo program posted
This year’s program features countless amazing presentations, workshops, exhibitions, demos, parties, and more! Check out who’ll be onstage and what's happening in the exciting city of Tokyo.
News Item ATypI 2020 All Over call for proposals extended to July 15, 2020
Proposals have been coming in at a rapid pace. Because it’s such a busy time of year for so many, we’ve extended the submission deadline by two weeks.
News Item ATypI 2020 All Over is not over!
Get more typographic education, conversation, and demonstration than ever before with an extended on-demand viewing period for ATypI 2020 registered participants.
News Item ATypI 2020 registration opens soon!
Get ready for an exciting experience designed by and for typography lovers from around the world. ATypI 2020 All Over is coming next month, and it’s an event you won’t want to miss.
News Item ECMAScript program ATypI Warsaw Sold Out—Tuesday Workshop Info for Registered Attendees
Yes, it's true, our 60th annual conference is sold out! Check out the info below for what to do if you're attending a workshop!
File Black and white in Indian typography
By D. Udaya Kumar. India is a diverse country with multiple scripts, Tamil and Sanskrit being the earliest among them. The ancient script, Brāhmī is the root of all Indian scripts. The script is also the parent to several other major script families of Central and Southeast Asia. Each of these Indian scripts evolved on its own course over centuries. The medium and tools used for writing played an important role in the evolution process. The palm leaf manuscripts were one of the major mediums used for written communication during the early periods. Their writing system and calligraphy were unlike the Far Eastern and Western calligraphic cultures. The concept of black and white was no concern for the calligrapher. In the majority of manuscripts the content was more important than the aesthetics of lettering or composition. On the other hand the present scripts have its roots from the unique writing system and medium. The scripts that has evolved with such culture and written practices reflected the same in the contemporary typography. Similar to the manuscript calligraphy the present typography that is seen all around has no concerns for the black and white. This raises the several important questions such as, is it important to balance the black and white in typography? Does the concept of black and white really matters in typography of Indian scripts? This paper primarily aims at understanding the concept of black and white in Indian typography especially in Tamil script. It discusses the calligraphy on palm leaf manuscript, influence of the medium and its writing system on letterforms. It also explores the issues related to aesthetics in Indian language typography in comparison to Western typography. From the ATypI 2012 conference in Hong Kong.
Located in Type & typography
Page Everyday handwriting
Sue Walker ATypI 2016 • Warsaw, Poland Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw ASP
Located in Type & typography
Event Exhibition : 26 Words
An exhibition at Anglia Ruskin University of the collaborative Letter Exchange project 26 Words, Exploring the DNA of language, where 26 writers were paired with 26 lettering artists to bring verbal and visual life to an eclectic selection of words.
Located in Events