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You are here: Home / Events / Talk : Ann Pillar : The gesture goes before the word: the letterforms of Edward Wright, 1959–1986

Talk : Ann Pillar : The gesture goes before the word: the letterforms of Edward Wright, 1959–1986

Letter Exchange March lecture given by Ann Pillar on Edward Wright, artist and graphic design pioneer in Britain, focussing on his lettering works produced from 1959 to 1986. A rare opportunity to hear such a critically informed view of the significant design contributions of Wright.
What Graphic design, Lettering
When Mar 18, 2015 from 06:30 PM to 07:30 PM

Lecture starts at 6.30pm prompt
Entrance on the door: members £7, non-members £10, students £5 

The Art Workers Guild
6 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AT

For more information about Letter Exchange events see here.

Ann Pillar / 
The gesture goes before the word: the letterforms of Edward Wright, 1959–1986

Edward Wright (1912–1988) was an artist of diverse skills: a painter, a maker of collages and reliefs, a printmaker, and sculptor. Born in Liverpool, he was educated by Jesuits and studied architecture in London before the war. Through his teaching at the Central School and Royal College of Art in the 1950s Wright pioneered the concept of graphic design in Britain. Working closely with architects he produced notable lettering for important buildings. The rotating sign for New Scotland Yard is his most widely-known public work.

Ann Pillar first encountered Edward Wright as a fine art student and in 2013 she completed a doctoral thesis on him. Fascinated by his lifelong interest in communication and obsession with the meaning which marks can offer, whether by intention or incidentally, this talk explores the paradoxical nature of Wright’s lettering works, produced from 1959 to 1986. No distinction is drawn between his public and private works, for in both fields Wright valued the creative element of play, and the rules and rituals which a process brings to the game. The aim is to show how, in Wright’s works, the gesture does indeed go before the word.

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